Waking Light – January to March 2018
Myths and Mirrors started 2018 with an 11-week youth arts program combining puppetry, mask- making, papier-mâché, and media arts. About 15 youth between the ages of 10-16 participated in weekly workshops at Victory Park, and a two-day introduction to stop-motion animation workshop with North Bay’s Near North Mobile Media Lab. Under the lead of Cora and Staci, participants used art to explore their fears as they prepared to say goodbye to the darkness and welcome the light with a community parade and celebration of the Spring Equinox. The final celebration took place March 20th and was attended by approximately 30 people.

ARTISTS: Cora-Rae Silk, Staci Duhaime, Holly Cunningham, Tammi Beaulieu, and Alan Asher



Empowering Women Through Arts – February 2018
Myths and Mirrors was invited to facilitate art activities for Empowering Women Through the Arts, a 4-week art workshop part of the Looking Ahead to Build the Spirit of Our Women: Learning to Live Free from Violence project, a partnership between N’Swakamok Native Friendship Centre and Greater Sudbury Police. Through weekly workshops, the 15 participants created plaster masks and 4 collaborative body maps, representing: pain and trauma, how others see me, how I see myself, and empowerment. The artwork was showcased at N’Swakamok Native Friendship Centre for International Women’s Week and at a special screening hosted by Sudbury Indie Cinema to honour Indigenous women in film.

ARTISTS: Cora-Rae Silk and Staci Duhaime



Home Is Where the ____ Is – Summer 2018
Over the summer, Myths and Mirrors hosted a series of workshops for community members of all ages to explore and share their ideas of ‘home.’ Using collage, paint, and DIY print-making techniques, around 25 participants created small paper houses to represent three things: what’s “built” their idea of home, what shelters them, and what they consider the heart of their home. This process was recorded for a short documentary, Home Is Where the ___ Is, shot and edited by our summer students, Aédan and Casey. The film was screened at Myths and Mirrors’ end-of-summer celebration and the artwork was presented as part of the Pop Up! Downtown Sudbury Art Crawl in partnership with Up Here 4 Urban Art + Music Festival.

ARTISTS: Cora-Rae Silk, Aédan Charest, Casey McGee, Quinn Organ, and Emily Maville



Who’s Next? – Summer 2018
For their summer project, summer students Aédan, Casey, Quinn, and Emily worked with youth from the community to create a youth art zine called Who’s Next? Created in response to the conservative government’s changes to Ontario’s public school curriculum, Who’s Next? features youth voices on why they need an inclusive curriculum that includes Indigenous content and sex education that is relevant and current. Who’s Next? was distributed at Myths and Mirrors’ end-of-summer celebration, several local businesses, and is available online as a downloadable pdf on Myths and Mirrors’ website.

ARTISTS: Aédan Charest, Casey McGee, Quinn Organ, and Emily Maville



Art in the Park – Summer 2018
In early August, Myths and Mirrors hosted a one-day Art in the Park event at Memorial Park in downtown Sudbury. Throughout the day, approximately 25 people stopped by to participate in family- friendly art activities, including sidewalk chalk-painting, mini-canvas painting, and bubble-blowing. To continue exploring the idea of ‘home,’ we constructed a large cardboard house that visitors were invited to paint with what ‘home’ means to them. This house was presented as part of the Home Is Where the ___ Is project at Myths and Mirrors’ end-of-summer celebration and as part of the Pop Up! Downtown Sudbury Art Crawl.

ARTISTS: Cora-Rae Silk, Aédan Charest, Casey McGee, Quinn Organ, and Emily Maville



Community Garden Mural
– Summer 2018
Myths and Mirrors staff assisted community artist, Staci Duhaime, with a mural celebrating 20 years of the Paris Street Community Garden – “growin’ since 1999.” In addition to helping prime and paint, staff lent a hand with a participatory painting activity at a community garden party for residents of the Paris Street and Rumball Terrace community.

ARTISTS: Staci Duhaime, Cora-Rae Silk, Aédan Charest, Casey McGee, Quinn Organ, and Emily Maville



FESTIVALS & EVENTS

Nuit Blanche
In January, Myths and Mirrors was invited to participate in the McEwen School of Architecture’s 2nd annual Nuit Blanche event. We featured artwork by ATA participants and a participatory art activity that allowed visitors to share two things: 1) something they were ready to leave in the past; and 2) something they wished to cultivate more of. These responses were later included in Myths and Mirrors’ Waking Light project.

Sudbury Graphic-Con
In June, Myths and Mirrors was asked to participate in Sudbury Graphic-Con’s Kids-Con event at The Market in downtown Sudbury. Artists Cora-Rae Silk and Staci Duhaime led several children’s art activities, including superhero hand puppets and comic book speech bubbles for the kids’ costume parade to Memorial Park.

Northern Lights Festival Boréal
Myths and Mirrors once again took part in the Northern Lights Festival Boréal’s Arts Village. Inspired by the theme of ‘air,’ we presented the Airheads Puppet Parade, led by our large mystical bird puppet. Festival-goers were invited to create masks and other parade props and were encouraged to join the parade as it travelled through the festival grounds.

Pop Up! Downtown Sudbury Art Crawl
Myths and Mirrors presented Home Is Where the ____ Is at The Market in downtown Sudbury as part of the Pop Up! Downtown Sudbury Art Crawl in partnership with Up Here 4 Urban Art + Music Festival. We showcased 25 small paper houses made by community members and the large cardboard house that visitors were once again invited to paint with what ‘home’ means to them.

FAAS (Foire d’art alternatif de Sudbury)
Myths and Mirrors was invited to participate in the GNO’s biannual FAAS at the end of October. This year the theme was territory; Laurie McGauley and Cora-Rae Silk created an installation that focused on video footage of the Robinson Huron Treaty court case, surrounded by piles of rocks with delicate tissue paper homes balanced precariously everywhere. The installation was titled My Home? My Territory? My Treaty?

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